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Rose Point School - Rose Point PA

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In about 1850 a man named John Stoner laid out the village of Stonertown, which soon became known as Rose Point. A schoolhouse was erected in 1861 off Old Butler Road and near the Presbyterian Church. A few years after Rose Point Academy (a prep school) was founded in 1891 the local school directors, seeking to help the struggling academy venture, abandoned their own schoolhouse and started renting out space in the large academy building. The academy closed due to financial issues in c1901, but the academy building was maintained primarily as the township high school. I believe the building was sold at a sheriff’s auction in 1911 and the local school board built a new two-story schoolhouse (shown above) soon after. This building was in service until it was finally closed in early August 1955. Any information regarding the exact location and fate of this two-story building would be appreciated. (c1940)

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Comment

  1. I went to first grade here. After that year the school closed and I went to another large elementary school in a nearby city for 2nd grade.
    I remember the out house in back, the pump on the front porch, and a playset in the back.
    Grades 1-6 were downstairs and 7-8 upstairs.
    There was a pot belly stove in the center of the room where we could dry our gloves and boots.

    I think teacher was Miss Maxwell.

    Crete Strawhecker Carey · 02/06/2014 12:19 AM · #

  2. I went to this school from 1951 until it closed in 1955. There were grades 1-4 downstairs and 5-8 upstairs. Mrs.Wilson taught downstairs in 1951 and Mrs.Rhodes taught upstairs. The recesses(winter and summer) were great fun. There was a large pasture behind the outhouses(where the campground is now situated) upon which a large Brahma bull roamed. Many students liked to tease him but I don’t know how mean he was or whether anyone ever got hurt by him.
    I will never forget the little crippled boy who lived in the house next door. He would stand at the fence and sadly watch us play during recess.I also remember walking to Audley McClymond’s General Store for penny candy. He was tall and lanky and was a prototype shopkeeper from the 19th century. I also remember turning in my seat in the school(during a warm spring day) and watching (through the wide open door) a farmer plowing the field across the road.

    Alan Dudash · 11/29/2014 10:47 PM · #