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Wurtemburg Cemetery - Wurtemburg PA

The first settler in the area of what became Wurtemburg in southeastern Lawrence County, Pennsylvania, arrived in about 1796. That settler, Ananias Allen, started a grist mill along the Slippery Rock Creek that became a commercial success. Other mills and shops sprung up as well. Beginning in the late 1820’s a host of German immigrants, most hailing from the province or state of Wurtemburg in southern Germany, began arriving in the area. Among the prominent new arrivals were German-born Jacob Liebendorfer and Irish-born James Mehard. A village was soon laid out and became known as Wurtemburg or more popularly as “Dutch Town.” Of course Dutch is taken from “Deutsch” – meaning German.

A small cemetery had been founded back in about 1800 on property that later became part of the Mehard family homestead on the north side of the Slippery Rock Creek. In 1860 the Wurtemburg Presbyterian Church, organized a year prior, was built on property just across the Wurtemburg Road from the cemetery. The church was built on property donated by James Mehard. The burial ground was never formally associated with the church, but you will occasionally find reference to the Wurtemburg Presbyterian Cemetery.

In early March 1925 a group of local citizens formed a committee to formally purchase the cemetery from the Mehard family heirs. The committee soon formed the Wurtemburg Cemetery Association to maintain the property. Among the surnames on the grave stones you will recognize some of the pioneering families of the area to include Blair, Hazen, Kirker, Liebendorfer, McElwain, Mehard, Miller, Rapp, Tindall, and Wimer. Today, the cemetery is still in active use for the local community and is well maintained.


To read an article about a mystery surrounding a grave located just outside the cemetery property in 1911 click on: MYSTERY OF GRAVE ARTICLE.


Wurtemburg Cemetery is located along Wurtemburg Road – just across the street from the Wurtemburg Presbyterian Church (seen at bottom). (c2013)


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Comment

  1. This cemetary was used by four famly’s from early Wurtemberg, i.e. Mehard, Leibendorfer, Rapp( nephew of Father Rapp) and Noss (german sp. Nass). These families were originally from Harmony and Zelienople, A gristmill and linseed oil mill was built by Jacob Liebendorfer and his son Daniel, Fredrick Rapp and Peter Noss. The sawmill adjoining the gristmill was built by Robert Mehard. At the time Peter Noss also had a distillery and a cooper shop. Each of the families have five or six members in the cemetary and all four families are together in the back of the lower end.

    Harry Bud Noss · 08/14/2013 03:33 PM · #

  2. My Grandfather and his brother came to America through New Oleans, thinking they would be coming to New York, from Wurttemberg Germany. I wondered if there are any names, Wandel in the cemetery, ancestors of my Grandfather. Grandfather was only 15, in 1859 when he came to this country, and at the time, Cooper by trade.

    Kathleen Wandel Nelson · 02/18/2016 11:11 AM · #

  3. As in #2 above my Great Grandfather I am told also came in through New Orleans and I think got married in Wurtemburg. It might have been Wurtemburg Germany I am not sure. I would be looking for the name Cable.

    Tom Cable · 06/06/2016 12:12 PM · #